Tony Awards Tournament: Best Musical 2010 to 2019 (Part 4)

Before continuing the tournament, I would like to pay tribute to Broadway actor Nick Cordero, who passed away from COVID-19 on July 5. Cordero had scene-stealing talent—his imposing 6ft, 5in frame making him a perfect fit for menacing roles. I saw Cordero perform in five shows: The Toxic Avenger, Rock of Ages, Bullets Over Broadway, Waitress, and A Bronx Tale. In The Toxic Avenger, Cordero threw himself with full manic energy into the role of nerd turned environmental superhero turned political. In Bullets Over Broadway, Cordero earned a Tony nomination for his turn as a mafia bodyguard with a secret talent for fixing bad scripts. Cordero will be greatly missed by the Broadway community. He is survived by his wife Amanda Kloots and his 9-month-old son.

Nick Cordero in his various roles. He starred as Melvin Ferd and as the titular superhero in The Toxic Avenger (with Celina Carvajal); as Cheech in Bullets Over Broadway (with Zach Braff); and as Sonny in A Bronx Tale (with Hudson Loverro)

Tournament Recap — the Final Four

Now that we are down to the elusive Final Four, trying to find flaws in any of the competitors is just nit-picking. Therefore, in this semi-final round I am going to celebrate the two musicals not moving to the finals with a consolation prize focusing on a Tony that each musical did not win in its respective year.

Dear Evan Hansen vs. Hamilton

Winner: Hamilton
Dear Evan Hansen consolation prize: Best Scenic Design

I have discussed how Dear of Hansen captures the fears and anxieties of today’s teenagers. The scenic design by David Korns embodies the paradoxical relationships we have with social media. During critical moments characters are surrounded by digital messages—big, small, relevant, immaterial, supportive, antagonistic. For Evan Hansen, this overload of technology contributes to his anxiety and his perception that no would listen to anything he has to say. The marvel of Korns’s work is that the flashing lights and moving screens do not distract from the characters on stage. Instead, they highlight that all of the characters feel this same sense of isolation at various times. Oddly enough, Dear Evan Hansen’s 9 Tony nominations did not include a nod for scenic design. My only explanation is the nominating committee fell for the allure of lavish sets in shows like Hello Dolly! and failed to grasp the more complex accomplishments of Evan Hansen‘s design.

Hamilton moves to the finals, but Dear Evan Hansen is worthy of its multi-year distinction as the second hottest musical ticket on Broadway.

Fun Home vs. Come From Away

Winner: Come From Away
Fun Home consolation prize: Best Featured Actress, Sydney Lucas

Sydney Lucas (with Michael Cerveris) in the iconic opening scene.

Fun Home lasted about a year and a half on Broadway, which is an achievement for a small-cast musical based on a very literary, autobiographical graphic novel. Alison Bechdel is split into three characters. Here oldest characterization is searching to find a reason behind her father’s suicide. Medium Alison is navigating the awkward first year when she acknowledged that she was a lesbian. However, Small Alison is the backbone for the entire show, and the actress playing her must convey innocence even as the audience begins to piece together the mysteries of her father. Why does Bruce tell her that he is “a bad man” when he is on his way to court? Where does Bruce sneak out to in the middle of the night in New York, leaving his kids alone in an apartment? Sydney Lucas singing “Ring of Keys” was the stand-out moment of the 2015 Tony Awards, and her brilliant performance lives on in Fun Home’s soundtrack.

Come From Away is a bigger, more universal musical making this particular bracket a mismatch, but Fun Home would be my choice in a tournament consisting just of the smaller musicals.

That leaves us with the final two shows: Hamilton and Come From Away. Check back soon to see which will be named the best Broadway musical of the 2010 decade.

Tony Awards Tournament: Best Musical 2010 to 2019 (Part 4)

Tony Awards Tournament: Best Musical 2010 To 2019 (Part 3)

Today we are continuing to the semifinals of the tournament to decide the best Tony-nominated musical of the 2010-2019 decade. I explained the methodology for choosing these musicals in part 1 of this series. These are the pairings for the semifinals. If you would like to see me explain my choices, here is a video.

Continue reading “Tony Awards Tournament: Best Musical 2010 To 2019 (Part 3)”
Tony Awards Tournament: Best Musical 2010 To 2019 (Part 3)

Tony Awards Tournament: Best Musical 2010 to 2019 (Part 2)

In this post I am going to declare the winners for the remaining four first-round pairings. My previous post explains the methodology I used to choose these 16 musicals as candidates for the best Tony-nominated musical of the 2010-2019 decade. If you would like to hear me explain my choices for each pairing, check out this video.

Continue reading “Tony Awards Tournament: Best Musical 2010 to 2019 (Part 2)”
Tony Awards Tournament: Best Musical 2010 to 2019 (Part 2)

Tony Awards Tournament: Best Musical 2010 to 2019 (part 1)

The Tony awards, originally scheduled for June 7, are delayed indefinitely due to the COVID-19 crisis. You can still check the potential nominees for Best Musical and Best Play (original and revival) at tonyawards.com.

YouTuber Katherine Steele created a March Madness-style Broadway musical tournament titled Which Broadway Show is the Best?, which I recommend watching. Fair warning that Katherine’s energy will make you feel lethargic by comparison. I decided to create my own tournament to determine my pick for the best musical of the 2010’s decade. I will be presenting this tournament over four posts, with each post featuring four pairings. For those who prefer a verbal run down of my choices, I created a video. Check out the video here.

The Methodology

I started by including the Best Musical winner from each year from 2010-2019. Unfortunately, a glowing omission exists because I have not yet seen Hadestown, so the 2019 Best Musial winner is not in the tournament. However, the other nine Tony winners from the decade are included along with seven wildcards–my seven favorite nominees that did not win Best Musical in their respective years.

The Bracket

Consider playing at home before reading my pics. The first-round pairings are based on a commonality between the two shows. If you have not seen one of the musicals, you can give its competitor a bye for the round. Also, I included links to each show’s performance at its respective Tony Awards ceremony, so you can see a small piece of each for yourself.

Continue reading “Tony Awards Tournament: Best Musical 2010 to 2019 (part 1)”
Tony Awards Tournament: Best Musical 2010 to 2019 (part 1)

Song of Spider-man by Glen Berger (a book review)

In the book Which Lie Did I Tell, famed screenwriter William Goldman explains a concept with applications beyond the movie business. To paraphrase, Goldman stated in reference to two films released in 1997: Of course everyone in America wanted to see a four-hour love story about the sinking of the Titanic, and no one wanted to see Kevin Costner play a singing post-apocalyptic mailman… in hindsight. The truth is, until they open, no one knows which movies people will want to see.

Spider-man_2
Continue reading “Song of Spider-man by Glen Berger (a book review)”
Song of Spider-man by Glen Berger (a book review)

An American in Paris—Drury Lane (3/12/20)

Before Thursday, March 12, I had not comprehended the extent to which COVID-19 is an unprecedented event in our lifetimes.  The reality, not surprisingly, hit me while I sat in a theater—specifically the Drury Lane Oakbrook. Prior to the show, two Drury Lane executives addressed the audience and tearfully announced that we were witnessing the last production of An American in Paris. This large-scale musical would be closing early in accordance with Governor Prizker’s executive order.

American in Paris_2
Will Skrip (as Henri) at the end of “(I’ll Build a) Stairway to Paradise”

Continue reading “An American in Paris—Drury Lane (3/12/20)”

An American in Paris—Drury Lane (3/12/20)

A Tribute to the Less-than-Enjoyable Theater Experience

The way I remember it, I am eight years old and playing Nintendo one Saturday morning when my father walks down the basement stairs to tell me about the play he and my mother saw the previous evening. He refers to the title as Say Yes, Pablo and notes that the play was supposed to be about Pablo Picasso but it was not really about anything, and in the place of normal dialogue there was a lot of chanting. He also said that 25 minutes into the show the first audience members exited out the back door, and the steady flow of unhappy patrons kept that back door open until the end.

Say Yes, Pablo holds a special meaing in our family. When we see a play that we really dislike, we say, “Well, at least it was better than Say Yes, Pablo.”

Continue reading “A Tribute to the Less-than-Enjoyable Theater Experience”

A Tribute to the Less-than-Enjoyable Theater Experience

Year in Review—2019’s Best Non-musicals

#1. All Quiet on the Western Front (Red Tape)

All Quiet on the Western Front_2
The gender-blind cast of All Quiet on the Western Front

The script by Matt Foss is a tribute to Erich Maria Remargue’s novel—a no-holds-barred criticism of war as seen through the eyes of WW1 soldiers, who have accepted that their survival means nothing to the unseen figures calling the shots. Elena Victoria Feliz as Paul moves through the most inventive staging of the year—war is played out on top of old pianos, and colored powders communicate the impact of bombs and bullets.

Continue reading “Year in Review—2019’s Best Non-musicals”

Year in Review—2019’s Best Non-musicals

Year in Review—2019’s Best Musicals

#1. Six (Chicago Shakespeare)

Six_Chicago Shakes
Abby Mueller, Samantha Pauly, Adrianna Hicks, Andrea Macasaet, Brittney Mack & Anna Uzele (each will be reprising her role on Broadway starting February 13)

I was skeptical about a rock musical starring the wives of Henry VIII until I learned that my friend’s teenage daughters were already devoted fans. Six (like Hamilton before it) is a testament to the power of using reimagined history to tell a story that reflects our contemporary world. Every song is a winner—particularly “Don’t Lose Ur Head” and “All You Wanna Do”—in this fun, inventive musical with a powerful feminist conclusion.

Continue reading “Year in Review—2019’s Best Musicals”

Year in Review—2019’s Best Musicals

NEW YORK SHOWS — 12/21/19 & 12/22/19

Greater Clements

Haley Sakamoto (Kel) and Edmund Donovan (Joe)

Samuel Hunter sits among my favorite playwrights based on the strength of The Whale and Pocatello. One can make a sure bet that a Hunter play will build to a mesmerizing, semi-tragic climax as characters push themselves beyond their own limitations.

Continue reading “NEW YORK SHOWS — 12/21/19 & 12/22/19”

NEW YORK SHOWS — 12/21/19 & 12/22/19